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Hunter College NYC Food Policy Center

Health Tech and Feeding an Urban Population

The goal of this report is to inspire readers – including academics, researchers, community-based organizations, funders, social entrepreneurs, policymakers, government agencies and others involved in the food movement – to think about innovative, technological ways to overcome the challenges facing the food system, including food insecurity (i.e., hunger), access to healthy food, food waste, food safety and food-related chronic diseases.

By describing the ways that technology has been used to find new solutions to long-standing food system problems and by identifying areas where technological development is lagging, the Hunter College New York City Food Policy Center hopes to also encourage those in the tech industry to partner with food system influencers to drive increased innovation in this
important sector.

This report focuses on the food supply chain and is the second in a series of five reports the Center will release over the next six months. The first report on Food Insecurity is available here. Subsequent topics include: Food Waste; Food Safety; and Nutrition and Diet-Related Diseases.

Download the report here>>>

The Price of Food in NYC: A Comparison of Supermarkets

Can a half gallon of milk cost $1.59 in one neighborhood and $4.84 in another that’s only a few miles away? Between February and April of 2017, under the direction of the Hunter College NYC Food Policy Center, 30 undergraduate Hunter College Nutrition students visited 41 supermarkets and farmers’ markets in their neighborhoods to answer that question.

As we know, there is no silver bullet for creating access to healthy food. Numerous factors, including convenience, affordability, transportation, previous shopping experiences, and even the weather can impact a person’s ability and/or desire to purchase fresh, nutritious food.

The data from this survey shines light on the wide variation in the cost of specific healthy food items and demonstrates that shopping for healthy foods on a budget isn’t easy. Shoppers have to be savvy, mindful, aware, and often willing to travel some distance to find healthy foods at the best price in New York City.

Download the report here>>>


Terminology: A Study of Two NYC Neighborhoods

With the increase in obesity and other diet-related diseases, as well as the persistence of food insecurity among many vulnerable populations, the need for transformative changes to our food systems and local food environments is critical.
In an effort to improve population health, and the health of New York City residents, the Hunter College New York City Food Policy Center is constantly seeking to better understand the differences and similarities across neighborhood food environments.

The Center conducted a short survey in East Harlem and the Upper East Side to understand knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors around food, and to inform policymaking that addresses food-related health inequities in New York City.

Download the report here>>>


FoodSystem-Innovation&Tech_2017_Page_001

Health Tech and Food Insecurity

The digital revolution over the past 25 years has transformed the way we communicate, learn, conduct business, purchase goods and obtain information. Industrialization, urbanization and market globalization have led to significant shifts in lifestyle, eating behavior and food choices worldwide. The Center’s latest report examines how technology can help the food system. The report is the first in a series of five about innovation and technology in the food system.
The goal of these reports is to inspire readers–including academics, researchers, community-based organizations, funders, social entrepreneurs, policymakers, government agencies and others involved in the food movement to think about innovative, technological ways to overcome the challenges facing the food system. These challenges include food insecurity, access to healthy food, food waste, food safety and food-related chronic diseases.
 
This first report discusses and demonstrates ways that technology can help food-insecure individuals access and afford food. Though not a solution to poverty and the other root causes of food insecurity, technology can make it easier for people to sign up for and use federal food assistance benefits, learn about resources in their communities, access nutrition education, plan low-cost meals and save money while grocery shopping. This report and upcoming reports include many examples that demonstrate creative solutions to complex food system issues and also identify areas where new technological developments are needed.
Download the report here>>>

 


Cover PhotoThe Public Plate in New York City

This report examines the health and economic impact of the more than 260  million meals the City serves each year in public schools, child care and senior citizen programs, homeless shelters, jails, hospitals, and other settings. This market power  can make healthier, more affordable food available to all New Yorkers. Over the last decade much has been done to improve this system; this report suggests specific ways and areas in which the new Mayoral administration can further improve institutional food.

Download the report here>>>

Download the executive summary here>>>

Download the supplement to the report here>>>

 

 

 

 


 

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Jobs For a Healthier Diet and a Stronger Economy

This report examines current efforts to create new food jobs in New York and explores opportunities for creating additional jobs that provide a living wage and contribute to making healthy food more available and affordable.  The report examines the role HUNTER and CUNY can play in creating a good food workforce for New York City.

Download the full report here>>>

Download the report (without executive summary) here>>>

Download the executive summary here>>>

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